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Archive for the ‘Kindle Highlights’ Category

These are two related highlights from Fingersmith by Sarah Waters. The character has entered a large private library in a home, having never so many books before, not knowing they even existed.

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Fingersmith (Sarah Waters)
– Highlight Loc. 2922-23 | Added on Friday, September 25, 2009

I know only two books, and one is black and creased about the spine—that is the Bible. The other is a book of hymns thought suitable for the demented; and that is pink.

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Fingersmith (Sarah Waters)
– Highlight Loc. 2949-53 | Added on Friday, September 25, 2009

‘What do you see here, all about these walls?’

‘Wood, sir.’

‘Books, girl,’ he says. He goes and draws one from its place and turns it. The cover is black, by which I recognise it as a Bible. The others, I deduce, hold hymns. I suppose that hymn-books, after all, might be bound in different hues, perhaps as suiting different qualities of madness. I feel this, as a great advance in thought.

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My Kindle 2 when she was new – all tucked in and ready to go for reading in bed.

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I’m still massively in love with my Kindle 2. (My first and only Kindle.) She’s 3.5 years old now and, despite a few signs of aging, she’s still going strong.

However, when she was around two years old her battery started going noticeably downhill. Using her every day I was having to recharge about every 4-5 days. (I generally recharge when the battery gets to the 50% mark.)

But I eeked things out for a long time. Until recently that is, when I’ve been having to charge every other day, sometimes every day. And the charge in that short time was getting down to around 25-30% remaining.

Part of the reason I waited so long to do anything about it, aside from being a champion procrastinator, is that the instructions on how to do the battery replacement are in the form of an online video, which I could not watch on dialup. Now that I’ve joined the 21st Century and have broadband, I figured it was time.

I ordered the replacement battery from NewPower99.com. Along with the battery you’re sent a shim tool for removing the cover, and a tiny magnetized screwdriver for handling the four teeny screws involved. Which is everything you need to do the replacement yourself.

There is a how-to video on the product page and watching it is fully instructive. The most difficult part for me was getting the small top plastic cover off. I worked at that quite a while before I could get it to pop off. The rest was a cinch.

Oh, well, almost a cinch. I almost forgot about the part where the volume control button/lever fell out. Heh. I was able to fit it back in place when reassembling my Kindle and I assume it still works. (I don’t use music, text-to-speech, or audiobooks on my Kindle, so even if I couldn’t have refit it, it wouldn’t have been a loss.)

After I replaced the battery and got my Kindle 2 put back together, it appeared that I’d killed her, and suffered several pangs of grief and regret. The screen was displaying my Home page, but none of the buttons worked, including the power slider.

Turns out she was just lying low until I could charge the new battery. A couple minutes after I plugged her in she did a reboot and the critical battery page came up on the screen. A bit later, after she got some juice, she started working normally again.

So the moral of the story is, don’t freak out, just plug it in and be patient until the charging light turns green.

I replaced the battery four or five days ago, and I’ve lost less than 25% of the charge in that time. If this battery is anything like when my Kindle 2 was new, it will perform even better after it’s been in use for 2-3 weeks.

So if you have a Kindle that is getting on in years and you’re tired of having to recharge frequently, I encourage you to go ahead and replace the battery yourself. It really is easy to do, and will breathe new life into it!

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[Note: Amazon offers to do battery replacement for a small fee, around the same price or only a little more than the purchase price and shipping for the battery from NewPower99. However, it means sending your Kindle to them and being sent a different one, with a fresh battery, in return. If you’re anything like me, you want YOUR Kindle, not just any ol’ Kindle. So replacing the battery yourself is the better solution.]

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This one is from Silent in the Sanctuary, a humorous Victorian mystery, by Deanna Raybourn:

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Silent in the Sanctuary (Deanna Raybourn)
– Highlight Loc. 5246-47 | Added on Wednesday, March 11, 2009

Now I was more certain than ever of my decision. I could not love a man who did not love Jane Austen.

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This highlight is from The Witching Hour by Anne Rice:

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The Witching Hour (Anne Rice)
– Highlight Loc. 6335-36 | Added on Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Give me a man or woman who has read a thousand books and you give
me an interesting companion. Give me a man or woman who has read
perhaps three and you give me a dangerous enemy indeed.
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Since getting my Kindle in February 2009 I’ve discovered the joys of highlighting passages in novels that delight or move me.

I have to admit that my rather shallow reading tastes are reflected in which passages I most often choose to highlight. I usually highlight something because it made me laugh out loud, or at least grin a little bit. Though occasionally I do select something because it’s beautifully worded or profound to me in some way.

In the last three years I’ve collected quite an assortment of quotations which talk about books, usually with reverence, though occasionally just the opposite. I’d been thinking for a while of starting to post some of my highlights on the blog, so what better place to start than with selections from books that talk about books.

My first offering is from The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield, in which the protagonist is the daughter of a used and rare bookshop owner:

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The Thirteenth Tale: A Novel (Diane Setterfield)
– Highlight Loc. 278-83 | Added on Tuesday, May 03, 2011, 02:30 AM

People disappear when they die. Their voice, their laughter, the warmth
of their breath. Their flesh. Eventually their bones. All living memory of
them ceases. This is both dreadful and natural. Yet for some there is an
exception to this annihilation. For in the books they write they continue
to exist. We can rediscover them. Their humor, their tone of voice, their
moods. Through the written word they can anger you or make you happy.
They can comfort you. They can perplex you. They can alter you. All this,
even though they are dead. Like flies in amber, like corpses frozen in
ice, that which according to the laws of nature should pass away is, by
the miracle of ink on paper, preserved. It is a kind of magic.

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